Fake online pharmacies

by Rudolf Faix Saturday, July 11, 2015 7:20 AM

drug storePeople have delighted in the true serenity of knowing their physician endorsed solutions are sheltered and successful. Be that as it may, a great deal has changed following the 1980's, including the presentation of the overall web - which has prompted an increment in maverick web drug store locales. Sadly, criminal systems around the globe have turn out to be progressively refined, exploiting a large number of patients around the world by offering shoddy fake medications on Internet locales, a number of which take on the appearance of true blue drug stores and showcase the trusted banner.

Since it is so natural to make a site, there are at present a huge number of these illegitimate locales. The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy has investigated more than 10,000 of them with really terrifying results: Only 3 percent of the destinations give off an impression of being in consistence with drug store laws and practice standards.

Fake online pharmacies use the Internet and spam emails to offer drugs and medicine at very cheap prices and/or without the need for a prescription from a doctor. If you use such a service and you actually do receive the products in response to your order, there is no guarantee that they are the real thing.

There are legitimate online pharmacies. These businesses will have their full contact details listed on their website and will also require a valid prescription before they send out any medicine that requires one

Protect yourself:

  • Avoid sites that are located outside of your country

  • Avoid sites that don’t indicate any physical address

  • Avoid sites that don’t have a license by the relevant government authority

  • Avoid sites without a licensed pharmacist to answer questions

  • Avoid sites that do not require a prescription

  • There are no magic pills, miracle cures or safe options for serious medical conditions or rapid weight loss.

  • Never commit to anything under pressure.

  • Don’t trust an unsubstantiated claim about medicines, supplements or other treatments. Consult your healthcare professional.

  • Check for published medical and research papers to verify the accuracy of the claims made by the promoters.

  • Ask yourself if this is really a miracle cure, wouldn’t my healthcare professional have told me about it?

 

Counterfeit Prescription Drugs

by Rudolf Faix Saturday, July 11, 2015 6:48 AM

mixed drugsA counterfeit medicine or a fake medication is a prescription or pharmaceutical item which is created and sold with the expectation to misleadingly speak to its source, validness or viability. A fake medication may contain wrong amounts of dynamic fixings, or none, may be shamefully handled inside of the body (e.g., ingestion by the body), may contain fixings that are not on the mark (which could possibly be destructive), or may be supplied with incorrect or fake bundling and naming. Solutions which are intentionally mislabeled to hoodwink purchasers - including mislabeled however generally certifiable bland medications - are fake. Fake medications are identified with pharma misrepresentation. Drug makers and wholesalers are progressively putting resources into countermeasures, for example, traceability and verification advancements, to attempt to minimize the effect of fake medications.

Honest to goodness, accurately marked, minimal effort non specific medications are not fake or fake (despite the fact that they can be forged), yet can be discovered up in anticounterfeiting authorization measures. In that regard, an open deliberation is boiling over in respect to whether "fake items are as a matter of first importance a danger to human wellbeing and security or inciting tension  is only an astute route for rich countries to make sensitivity for expanded assurance of their protected innovation rights". Bland medications are liable to ordinary regulations in nations where they are made and sold.

Tips for Avoiding Counterfeit Prescription Drugs:

  • Be mindful of appearance. Closely examine the packaging and lot numbers of prescription drugs and be alert to any changes from one prescription to the next.

  • Consult your pharmacist or physician if your prescription drug looks suspicious.

  • Alert your pharmacist and physician immediately if your medication causes adverse side effects or if your condition does not improve.

  • Use caution when purchasing drugs on the Internet. Do not purchase medications from unlicensed online distributors or those who sell medications without a prescription. Reputable online pharmacies will have a seal of approval.

  • Be aware that product promotions or cost reductions and other "special deals" may be associated with counterfeit product promotion.

 

Health and Medical Scams

by Rudolf Faix Saturday, July 11, 2015 5:38 AM

Drug: Miracle CureMedical scams prey on human suffering. They offer solutions where none exist or promise to simplify complex health treatments.

Miracle cure scams offer a range of products and services that can appear to be legitimate alternative medicines, usually promising quick and effective remedies for serious medical conditions. The treatments claim to be effective against a very wide range of ailments and are often promoted using testimonials from people who have used the product or service and have been "cured".

Weight loss scams promise dramatic weight loss with little or no effort. This type of scam may involve an unusual or restrictive diet, revolutionary exercise or "fat-busting" devices, or breakthrough products such as pills, patches or creams. The products are promoted with the use of false claims such as "lose 10 kilos in 10 days" or "lose weight while you sleep", and often require large advance payments or that you enter into a long-term contract to participate in the program.

Fake online pharmacies use the Internet and spam emails to offer drugs and medicine at very cheap prices and/or without the need for a prescription from a doctor. If you use such a service and you actually do receive the products in response to your order, there is no guarantee that they are the real thing.

There are legitimate online pharmacies. These businesses will have their full contact details listed on their website and will also require a valid prescription before they send out any medicine that requires one

Protect yourself:

  • There are no magic pills, miracle cures or safe options for serious medical conditions or rapid weight loss.

  • Never commit to anything under pressure.

  • Don’t trust an unsubstantiated claim about medicines, supplements or other treatments. Consult your healthcare professional.

  • Check for published medical and research papers to verify the accuracy of the claims made by the promoters.

  • Ask yourself if there is really a miracle cure available, wouldn’t my healthcare professional have told me about it?

 

Internet Fraud

by Rudolf Faix Saturday, July 11, 2015 2:56 AM

three monkeys: don't see, don't speak, don't hearScammers can use the Internet to promote fraud through unsolicited or junk emails, known as spam and advertisings. Even if they only get a handful of replies from the millions of emails they send out, it is still worth their while. Be wary of replying, even just to "unsubscribe", because that will give a scammer confirmation that they have reached a real email address. Any email you receive that comes from a sender you do not know, is not specifically addressed to you, and promises you some benefit is likely to be spam.

Malicious software - also referred to as malware, spyware, key loggers, trojan horses or trojans - poses online security threats. Scammers try to install this software on your computer so that they can gain access to files stored on your computer and other personal details and passwords.

Phishing scams are all about tricking you into handing over your personal and banking details to scammers. The emails you receive might look and sound legitimate but in reality genuine organizations like a bank or a government authority will never expect you to send your personal information by an email or online.

Scammers use a wide range of tricks to get their software onto your computer. They may trick you into clicking on a link or pop-up message in a spam email, or by getting you to visit a fake website set up solely to infect people’s computers.

Scammers can easily copy the logo or even the entire website of a genuine organization. So don’t just assume an email you receive is legitimate. If the email is asking you to visit a website to "update", "validate" or "confirm" your account information, be sceptical.

Delete phishing emails. They can carry viruses that can infect your computer. Do not open any attachments or follow any links in phishing emails.

Online auctions and Internet shopping can be a lot of fun and can also help you find good deals. Unfortunately, they also attract scammers.

Scammers will often try to get you to deal outside of online auction sites. They may claim the winner of an auction that you were bidding on has pulled out and offer the item to you. Once you have paid, you will never hear from them again and the auction site will not be able to help you.

Listed below are tips to protect yourself and your family from various forms of Internet fraud:

  • If you choose to shop online or participate in online auctions, make sure you know about refund policies and dispute-handling processes, and be careful that you are not overcharged. Also, you may want to use an escrow service, such as PayPal. This service will hold your payment and only release it to the seller once you have confirmed that you received what you paid for. There is usually a small fee for this service. A legitimate bank or financial institution will never ask you to click on a link in an email or send your account details through an email or website.

  • Never buy from bidders with poor ratings on auction sites, and do your best to ensure that you are only making purchases from genuine shopping sites. Never provide your personal, credit card or account information unless you are certain the site is genuine.

  • Don’t reply to spam emails, even to unsubscribe, and do not click on any links or call any telephone number listed in a spam email. Make sure you have current protective software or get advice from a computer specialist.

  • If an email or pop-up offers you a product or service that genuinely interests you and it seems reasonable, be sure that you understand all the terms and conditions and costs involved before making a purchase or providing your details.

  • Ask yourself: By opening this suspect email, will I risk the security of my computer? Are the contact details provided in the email correct? Telephone your bank or financial institution to ask whether the email you received is genuine.

 

Fraudulent "Anti-Aging" Products

by Rudolf Faix Friday, July 10, 2015 3:41 PM

woman with cream on her face - scaringAttempting to purchase the wellspring of youth is similar to tossing cash into a dry wishing admirably. The cash is run and you're left with only purge jugs of unfilled guarantees. What's more, the boomer era is the precise business that makers of against maturing items - some genuine, some not - target.

It isn't only the creams and elixirs offered nowadays. Men and ladies of all ages can be casualties of futile supplements and perilous blends, for example, implied hormone-substitution treatments being sold by dishonest and unregulated sources.

Thus, before you purchase any against maturing item making enormous guarantees, know the notice indications of a trick and know the right things to ask.

At the point when spending your well deserved money on against maturing items, verify you are purchasing an item that works and are not purchasing a vacant guarantee.

In the event that a supplement or individual consideration item makes a case, request the exploratory confirmation to back it up. Verify that an impartial lab or outsider did the supporting studies, not the producer's group or any organization put resources into benefits. Make inquiries, for example, whether the trials were done on members in your age bunch and your ethnicity.

Try not to depend on Internet surveys. While a few retailers and autonomous audit destinations offer impartial client surveys, numerous web search tool results will convey audits made by and/or paid for by those advancing the item.

Advertisements squawk about a “secret formula,” or a “breakthrough,” but never define those terms or offer evidence. Other catchphrases to beware of are “scientific breakthrough,” “exclusive product,” “secret ingredient” or “active remedy.”

Also, a big name support isn't solid confirmation. Most famous people are remunerated to embrace an item. Furthermore, be mindful of individual testimonials that are deceiving.

Any case that says it is superfluous to counsel a specialist is a warning. Before beginning any eating routine, nourishing supplement or new wellbeing administration, you ought to check with your specialist.

What's more, remember when taking supplements that there may be a genuine danger of communication with doctor prescribed meds. Notwithstanding bundling or commercial cases, items you ingest or put on your skin or generally expend can conceivably have genuine symptoms.

What's more, don't succumb to the white scientist's jacket. Ordinarily producers will attempt to pass on believability by having the representative wear a white laboratory garment and even a stethoscope, giving the appearance they are a medicinal expert, or utilizing words, for example, "institutes" or "academies" to reinforce validity.

Consistently, a significant number of us do basic and safe things to enhance our wellbeing and appearance, for example, utilization sunscreen or spread the dim with haircolor. While there are numerous protected approaches to battle the presence of maturing, specialists caution buyers against becoming tied up with the thought that its anything but difficult to turn around the maturing procedure.

Some hostile to maturing items or systems asserts that the key is as simple as controlling a solitary hormone, or that their items is an off-mark use as an "option" to conventional and FDA-endorsed employments of the medication.

Tips for Avoiding Fraudulent "Anti-Aging" Products:

  • If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Watch out for "Secret Formulas" or "Breakthroughs".

  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions about the product. Find out exactly what it should and should not do for you.

  • Research a product thoroughly before buying it. Call the Better Business Bureau to find out if other people have complained about the product.

  • Be wary of products that claim to cure a wide variety of illnesses - particularly serious ones - that don’t appear to be related.

  • Be aware that testimonials and/or celebrity endorsements are often misleading.

  • Be very careful of products that are marketed as having no side effects.

  • Question products that are advertised as making visits to a physician unnecessary.

  • Always consult your doctor before taking any dietary or nutritional supplement.

 

Follow me

Tag cloud

AboutMe

I'm since more then 35 years in the computer business (programming and technical support) and using the Internet since it has started. Since 2002 I'm programming solutions for Asterisk and since 2004 I'm in the call center industry.

Disclaimer

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. I make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis. By browsing or using content from this site you accept the full legal disclaimer of this website.


web page counter code